DIAGNOSIS GLOSSARY

Abandonment Anxiety Fear, either founded in irrationality or history, of being left behind. 
Agoraphobia Fear of open spaces.  Typical in the package of kennelitis with neophobia but can exist as a solitary condition.  Usually manifests outdoors as a panic to re-enter a covered are or return indoors.
Attention Seeking Behavior Animal uses vocal or physical behaviors to obtain passive or active attention from people when the people are engaged in passive or active activities not directly involving the animal.  The animal directs attention to self by interrupting human activity.  (Overall)
Barrier Frustration A vocal and/or physical display that can appear to be aggression or territorial aggression when presented with a barrier or restriction.  Barrier Frustration can be concurrent to Separation Anxiety and can be difficult to treat when combined.  Barrier Frustration can progress to Barrier Anxiety.
Brotophobic See Thunderstorm Phobia.
Calming Signals One of several dozen identified segments of canine body language that universally signals to other animals.  Can also be termed as cutoff signals or passive avoidance although different references classify Displacement vs Calming signals differently (see also Displacement Signals).

Calming Signals include: Head turn, full-body turn, nose licking, lip licking, freezing, exaggerated slow movements, walking slowly, offering a SIT or a DOWN, splitting or body-blocking and out-of-context scratching.
Canine Compulsive Disorder (CCD) [Previously termed as Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD )] Repetitive, stereotypic motor, locomotor, grooming, ingestive, or hallucinogenic behaviors that occur out of context to their normal occurrence or in a frequency of duration that is in excess of that required to accomplish the ostensible goal.  As above in a manner that interferes with the animal’s ability to otherwise normally function in its social environment.

Repetitive, out-of-context behaviors that are not interruptible by conventional stimuli (social or gustatory) for more than a short period, and that consistently interfere with the animal’s ability to engage in what were formerly “normal” behaviors.  It is not clear whether the manifestation of OCD is indicative of varying underlying neuroanatomical or neurophysiological modalities.  (Overall)
Canine Control Complex (CCC) Canine Control Complex is a [potentially] dangerous dominance [situation].  CCC includes some or all of the following: Food-related aggression, Possessive aggression, Territorial aggression, Protective aggression, Dominance aggression , and Redirected aggression .  (Overall)
Chronically Undersocialized Generally considered to have “kennelitis .”  Symptoms include moderate to severe neophobia .  One hundred percent of normal cannot be achieved even with extensive counter-conditioning.  But a better comfort level for both the animal and the owner is the goal of treatment. 
Cognitive Dysfunction Change in interactive, elimination or navigational behaviors attendant with aging that are explicitly not related to primary failure of any organ system.  (Overall)

Failure to observe habitual rituals such as greeting etc., may fail to recognize family members.  Sometimes appears to be depression.
Confinement Anxiety A fear, either irrational or historically based, of being in small confining areas like a crate or cage.
Coprophagia Ingestion of feces that is neither accidental nor incidental.  Maternal ingestion is normal.  May be a scavenging techniques useful in poor-nutrient environments.  In extreme cases the animal seeks feces to ingest and may ingest their own as it is produced.  In the latter case may be indicative of OCD, an anxiety-based disorder.  (Overall)
Crate Anxiety An abject fear or merely restlessness when being closed into a crate or other confined space.  Sub-classification of Confinement Anxiety that is specific o the crate and no other confinement.  Unlike Separation Anxiety the pattern of distress increases with time in confinement.
Cutoff Signals See Calming Signals
Depression Prolonged reactive withdrawal from social stimuli, changes in appetite, and changes in sleep/wake cycles that are not incidental and are not attributable solely to lethargy.  Can exhibit decreased motor activity, and actual physical removal from normal social and environmental stimuli in the absence of any underlying neurological or physiological condition.  (Overall)
Displacement Behavior One of several dozen identified segments of canine body language that universally signals to other canines, generally regardless of breed.  Can also be termed as cutoff signals or passive avoidance although different references classify Displacement vs Calming signals differently (see also Calming Signals/Cutoff Signals). Some ethologists use the phrase “Pacifying Behavior.”  These are not necessarily interchangeable.

Displacement signals are identified as: licking intention (lip licking), squinting, shaking-off, sudden sniffing of the ground (as if a “new” scent just “appeared”, excessive sneezing after contact and out-of-context scratching.

“Displacement Activity is activity performed to change the motivation in a given situation, in order to escape.  The individual tries to achieve a sense of security by performing an activity which it feels safe with and connect with pleasure.”  (Abrantes)

“An activity that is performed out of context or “displaced,” because the animal is frustrated in its attempt to execute another activity or otherwise occupy itself.  This is considered less specific than redirected activity, which implies a substitution of behavior “in kind” but toward another target.  In cases of displacement activity, the activity may not be “in kind.”  (Overall)
Displacement Clusters Rapid firing sequential displays of displacement behaviors.  Usually indicative of high stress.
Dominance Priority access, whether given or attained to preferred limited resources.  (McConnell)
Dominance Aggression One of the thirteen classifications of aggression.  [This is sometimes (improperly termed) status related aggression/dc].  Dominance and Dominant Aggression are tow different things.  Dominant dogs are not always aggressive.

“Dominance is a concept found in traditional ethology that pertains to an individuals ability, generally under controlled conditions, to maintain or regulate access to some resource.” 

“Sentinel symptoms include: abnormal, out-of-context level of aggression (threat, challenge or attack) consistently exhibited by dogs toward people under any circumstances involving passive or active control of the dog’s behavior or the dog’s access to the behavior.  Intensification of any aggressive response from the dog with any passive or active correction or interruption of the dog’s behavior.” 

“90% of dominance aggressive dogs are male; onset concurrent with social maturity (18 to 36 months of age); if female may occur in a very young puppy; worsens with punishment (hallmark); may run in family lines.  May also have one or more of the following: territorial aggression, redirected aggression, food-related aggression, and/or possessive aggression.”  (Overall)
Elimination Aversion Consistent avoidance of location or substrates formerly used for elimination; can be accompanied by behaviors that are concurrent with active or passive avoidance or distaste that is amplified if the animal is forced to eliminate in the area or on the substrate that the animal finds aversive.  (Overall)
Elimination Location Preference Consistent elimination in an area or a few areas that are restricted to one location and are not linked by some common sensory aspect.  (Overall)
Excessive Grooming Grooming by means of licking, scratching or rubbing that is unrelated to hygienic or maintenance needs and that is more frequent or more intensive than has been exhibited in the past under the same conditions; grooming that represents a change in previous behavior but that is interruptible and is not associated with any profound changes in either the animal’s time budget because of the amount of time that grooming requires or in social interactions.  (Overall)
    Individual cases may be a subset of OCD, an anxiety-based disorder.
Excitement Elimination Urination that occurs only when the dog is engaged in active behavior and is concomitantly demonstrating physical and physiological signs of excitement (rapid motor activity that may occur vertically and horizontally, high pitched greeting, panting and salivation associated with open-mouth, relaxed greeting face) rather than fear.  Urination as above that occurs when the animal is not sitting or lying down, or approaching sitting or lying down, and about which the patient may exhibit no signs of awareness.  (Overall)
Fear Aggression One of the thirteen classifications of aggression.  Sentinel symptoms include: aggression that consistently occurs concomitant with behavioral and physiological signs of fear as identified by withdrawal, passive and avoidance behaviors associated with the sympathetic branch of the autonomic system.  Aggression may be accompanied by urination or defecation.  Barking, growling or snarling while backing up; may shake and tremble during and after aggression; may bite from behind and then run away; may be associated with painful medical treatment or abuse; can be induced by inappropriate punishment; recipient can be human or canine; dog will cower, and look for escape routes – becoming dangerous if cornered .  (Overall)
Feeding Anxiety Anxiousness about food, whether in the presence or not.  Anxiety can manifest while eating.  Anxiety may be present in the form or overeating as if to possess by ingestion (similar to psychogenic polydipsia).  Free-feeding may make the anxiety worse.
Flashback Disorder (P.T.S.D.) A phobia or generalized phobic response to a fear of an actual historical traumatic event which riggers into a fear-response when some or all of the antecedents are present.
Food-Related Aggression One of the thirteen classifications of aggression. Sentinel symptoms include: consistent aggression that is exhibited in the presence, and only in the presence of pet food, bones, rawhides, biscuits, blood and human food, in the absence of torture and starvation.  Growling when eating if approached or in sight of other dogs or people; involves tremendously long approach distances; will bite if perceives threat (real or imagined) to food; either turns and actively guards food or continues to east in uncoordinated manner while growling, often dropping food in the process; may be nonaggressive with dog food but aggression escalates with rawhides, real bones, food scraps or treats (high quality or highly coveted items); part of the control complex that involves dominance aggression; single best early indicator that dominance aggression may develop .  (Overall)

Not necessarily limited to pet food, can also be human food which is stolen, or merely in the presence of human food not possessed.
Generalized Anxiety (Formerly Generalized Reactivity to Environmental Stress.)  Consistent exhibition of increased autonomic hyperactivity, increased motor activity, and increased vigilance and scanning that interfere with the normal range of social interaction sometimes in the absolute absence of and prevocational stimuli.  (Overall)

Similar to Generalized Anxiety Disorder in humans.  Usually accompanied by specific-type anxieties.  Rarely seen as a solitary diagnosis.
Greeting Anxiety The urge to greet incoming housemates, friends or strangers.  The urge to greet can be compounded by inappropriate punishment which in absence of adequate training can create a stronger desire to greet but an can simultaneously create an anxiety to greet.   Dogs caught in a greeting anxiety cycle greet inappropriately because they don’t know how to greet appropriately, but do so fanatically because of prior conditioning and mixed signals.
Hyper Displacement Anxiety The frantic application of displacement activities (displacement clusters) that may occur in a high-stress situation.
Hyper Isolation Anxiety The frantic play and running behavior that occurs after long periods of crating.  HIA can also manifest as aggression, manic play solicitation and/or attention seeking.  May or may not include vocalization.
Hyperesthesia Repetitive, uninterruptible tactile response in excess of that warranted by external stimuli of that may occur in the absence of external stimuli and may be accompanied by locomotor activity and vocalization.  In extreme cases may be a subset of the OCD [CCD] complex.  (Overall)
Idiopathic Aggression One of the thirteen classifications of aggression. Sentinel symptoms include: aggression that occurs in an unpredictable, toggle-switch manner in contexts not associated with stimuli noted for any other behavioral aggressive diagnosis and in the absence of underlying casual physical or physiological condition.  Most commonly reported in dogs from one to three years of age; usually is misdiagnosed as dominance aggression ; can be associated with severe head trauma or respiratory arrest (non-medical in origin).  Clinical diagnosis is Aggression caused by psychological disturbance . (Overall).     

Idiopathic meaning of no obvious organic or behavioral cause.  Unpredictable by nature and is not treatable through behavioral modification techniques.  Some types of idiopathic aggression are believed to be seizure-related and may respond to the use of anti-convulsants.  Symptoms include out-of-context aggressive episodes with no observable trigger.  Typically the events surrounding the vent are not related with absolutely nothing in common with each other, except for the aggressive event.  Frequently the eyes glaze over and the pupils enlarge.  The animal is not responsive to any stimulus during these attacks.  Severe damage to persons or property is often the result.  After the incident, the animal is unaware that it caused any damage and can appear to be disoriented.   In most cases euthanasia is the best and safest option . 
Inappropriate Elimination Elimination that is not related to an underlying physical or physiological condition and that represents a change from the animal’s previous behavior.  (Overall) 

Urination or defecation in undesired places.  Typically called housesoiling it is elimination anywhere that is not desired or any place other than the area trained.  In a trained dog, this can be a symptom of a physical or behavioral disorder.  With inappropriate elimination in trained adults, retraining or behavioral modification cannot begin until a veterinarian has given the canine a clean bill of health.
Inappropriate Greeting Consistent exhibition of behaviors (e.g. growling) not usually associated with greeting only [shown] in greeting circumstances.  This may be a specific case of attention seeking behavior .  Any of the behaviors that could be involved in inappropriate greeting could also be associated with other conditions.  (Overall)
Inappropriate Play Play behaviors (play-bows, yips, shoulder blocks) that occur in circumstances that are out-of context; out-of-context conditions include circumstances in which the behaviors are directed toward inanimate objects; social circumstances in which play is not relevant (challenge), or behaviors that occur in contexts consistent with the solicitation of play but that involve actions that would discourage play (biting, pain).  (Overall)

Aggressive or out-of-context play.  Play is defined as aggression without the benefit of intent.  Typically play behavior is aggressive behavior in non-continuous segments, offered out of the usual continuum and context.  Inappropriate play is therefore play that falls within the aggression continuum.
Incomplete Housebreaking Consistent and age-appropriate elimination in undesirable locations or at undesirable times that is not associated with any lack of access or opportunity, other behavioral conditions, or any physical or physiological condition.  (Overall)
Interdog/Interanimal Aggression One of the thirteen classifications of aggression.    Sentinel symptoms include: consistent, volitional, proactive aggression that is not contextual given the social signals, threat circumstances, or response received.  In absence of any signal or interaction from the animal that is attacked.      

This is commonly male-male or female-female and is status-related; can be a form of sexual competition (may be worse if female dog in heat is present with intact male dogs); onset is usually social maturity (18 to 24/36 months of age depending on breed); challenges may start as stares, bumps, mounting, or exclusion by lateral body blocks from food, play or attention; may be generalized or may occur only in specific singular control/contest situations (i.e. access to bed, access to doors and certain rooms); may be made worse by endogenous hormones, but is social and usually occurs in households with neutered pets and may occur between early (pediatric) neutered pets; related to actual or perceived hierarchical relationships;  older or weaker dogs may be victimized (caution for temporarily ill dogs that have frequently been challenged as above).  (Overall)
Leadership Anxiety Anxious and/or hyperactive behavior as a result of unclear leadership (hierarchy) in a stable pack.  May also be termed Status-Related Anxiety.
Leash Sensitive Aggression Dogs who display aggression symptoms only when confined by a leash.  (LSA is directed toward humans as opposed to LSDA (below) which is directed toward other dogs)
Leash Sensitive Dog Aggression Dogs who display dog aggression symptoms only when confined by a leash.
Marking Behavior Urination or defecation that occurs in frequencies and locations, or both, that are inconsistent solely with the evacuation of the bladder and bowel but are consistent with social and olfactory stimuli.  Repeated urination or defecation associated with species-typical postures distinct from those used in simple elimination that occurs in frequencies, locations, of both that are inconsistent solely with the evacuation of the bladder or bowel but consistent with limited and identifiable social and olfactory stimuli.  (Overall)

“By definition urine marking involves the frequent disposition of small volumes of urine in strategic locations.”  (Dodman) Territorial in nature, can be a symptom, but does not necessarily lead into Territorial Aggression.
Maternal Aggression One of the thirteen classifications of aggression.  Symptoms include: consistent aggression (threat, challenge or contest) directed toward puppies in the absence of pain, challenges or threats to the mother by them.  Unprovoked, age-appropriate attacks to puppies by the mother.  (Overall) Protection of toys and bedding from people and other dogs; long-distance vocalization if puppies are present, may nip if pup is taken, usually vocal; if constantly threatened, may eat toy or pup; dependent upon hormonal state, passes with change in hormones.  (Overall)
Neophobia Consistent sustained, sudden and profound, non-graded response to unfamiliar objects, and circumstances manifest as intense, active avoidance, escape, or anxiety behaviors associated with the activities of the sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system; behaviors can include catatonia or mania concomitant with decreased sensitivity to pain or social stimuli; repeated exposure results in an invariant pattern of response.  (Overall)
Noise Phobia Sudden and profound, non-graded, extreme responses to noise manifest as intense, active avoidance, escape or anxiety behaviors associated with the activities of the sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system; behaviors can include catatonia or mania concomitant with decreased sensitivity to pain or social stimuli; repeated exposure results in an invariant pattern of response.  (Overall)
Non-Frustrative Complex see Frustration Intolerance .
Pain Aggression One of the thirteen classifications of aggression.  Sentinel symptoms include: consistent aggressive behavior, in excess of that required to indicate concern and to effect restraint, demonstrated only in a context known or potentially associated with pain, but that may not be painful itself.  In the absence of any behavioral and physiological signs of fear as identified by withdrawal, passive and avoidance behaviors associated with the sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system. 

Usually a response to being manipulated, or before manipulation of something the dog has learned is painful; does not necessarily back up – will grab hands with teeth in an attempt to stop pain or anticipated pain (intensity and duration of bite depend on environmental and socialization factors); may be in response to rough play from children and other dogs, particularly if recipient is old and arthritic; can progress to fear aggression.   (Overall)
Pica Consistently exhibits ingestion of nonfood material in a manner not consistent with past behavior.  Incessant consumption of nonfood material in a manner that interferes with normal social function.  (Overall)
Play Aggression One of the thirteen classifications of aggression.   Sentinel symptoms include: consistent aggression that occurs in contexts in which play behaviors (play-bows, yips, shoulder blocks and so on) would normally occur.  Out-of-context, consistent aggression in circumstances when play is relevant; or that occurs in contexts consistent with the solicitation of play, but that involves actions that would discourage play (biting, pain). 

Barking, snapping, growling while playing, usually with people or other dogs; may start with play vocalizations and change to serious growling in response to rougher play; usually puppies or younger dogs; dog may never have learned to play, plays roughly and uses actual growls rather than play growls with other dogs; uses teeth to grab people’s hands, legs clothing; even when playing tug with a toy will deliberately grab arm instead.  (Overall)
Possessive Aggression One of the thirteen classifications of aggression.  Sentinel symptoms include: aggression that is consistently directed toward another individual who approaches or attempts to obtain a nonfood object or toy that the aggressor possesses or to which the aggressor controls access.  In the absence of the object associated with the contentious behavior the aggressor is nonaggressive. 

A demonstrated unwillingness to relinquish toys or stolen objects (objects can be stolen in play from another dog or a human); may present objects for play and then growl if someone tries to take them; may protect an object from across a room; part of the control complex that involves dominance aggression .  (Overall)
A Possessive Aggressive Dog is labeled as a PAD./dc
Predatory Aggression One of the thirteen classifications of aggression.  Sentinel symptoms include: quiet aggression or behaviors congruent with subsequent predatory behavior (staring, salivating, stalking, body lowering and tail twitching), consistently exhibited in either circumstances associated with predation or toward victims that usually include infant or young or ill animals; death is not a necessary sequella, nor is ingestion, should death ensue.  Quiet, unheralded attacks, generally involving at least one fierce bite and shake, that include staring, salivating, stalking, body lowering and tail witching, consistently exhibited toward species-contextural prey items (e.g. cat, birds), or toward individuals that exhibit uncoordinated movements and sudden sleep and wake cy les (human infants, young or ill animals, geriatric humans); death is not a necessary sequella, nor is ingestion, should death ensue.

The silent stalking of small animals, birds; may also stalk infants or stare at them silently, drooling; may track and stalk bicyclists or skateboarders; pattern of high-pitched sounds, uncoordinated motion, and sudden silences may provoke aggression; considered to be very dangerous .  (Overall)
Protective Aggression One of the thirteen classifications of aggression.  Sentinel symptoms include: aggression that is consistently demonstrated when an individual or class of individuals is approached by a third party in the absence of an actual, contextual threat from that third party.  As above, when the aggression intensifies with decreasing distance or with vocal or physical cues that could indicate excitement or threat despite attempts at intervention, correction, or the desire to interact on the part of the individual being “protected.”

The protection of an individual from people or other dogs; may single out one person to protect; stands between person being protected and others, barks, growls, snarls, bites, with likelihood for more aggressive behaviors to occur the closer the person is; may be stimulated to react by quick moves or embraces; unaggerssive in the absence of its protected individual(s).  (Overall)
Pseudocyesis Maternal behavior exhibited in the absence of pregnancy.  Maternal or nesting behaviors exhibited in the absence of pregnancy that develop within 60 days of estrus and may be exhibited toward animate or inanimate objects.  (Overall)
Psychogenic Destruction  
Psychogenic Fecal Incontinence Defecation in the absence of underlying physiological or physical conditions such as fear, separation anxiety and any other behavioral condition that primarily involve elimination (Overall). 

Inability to retain feces with no organic reason for incontinence. Symptoms may include an unawareness of the defecation.  The animal may or may not defecate while sleeping.  There is no behavioral assistance for this condition.
Psychogenic House-Soiling Elimination that is not related to any underlying physical or physiological condition and that represents a change from the animal’s previous behavior, especially if there is no question that the animal is housetrained or has consistently exhibited appropriate elimination behaviors in the past.  (Overall)
Psychogenic Hyperactivity Motor activity in excess of that warranted by the animal’s age and stimulation level that occurs in a consistent manner and does not respond to correction, redirection or restraint.  Can be concomitant with sympathetic signs (increased heart rate, increased respiratory rate, vasodilation) even when at rest, in the absence of other signs or significant laboratory data associated with thyroid disease and the dog responds to treatment with amphetamine or methylphenidate with paradoxical decrease in motor activity.  (Overall)
Psychogenic Pain/Distress Behavioral signs of pain (withdrawal, vocalization, selective use, decreased motor activity) that occur in the absence of known causal stimuli and in the absence of any other behavioral condition associated with such signs.  (Overall)
Psychogenic Polydipsia Psychogenic Water Drinking .  Consumption of water in excess to that necessary to meet daily fluid balance needs or in excess of that needed to thermo-regulate or lubricate ingestion of food.  May or may not exhibit an alteration in the animal’s daily time budget; the behaviors may interfere with the animal’s ability to interact in its social and physical environment and represent a change in the animal’s behavior.  (Overall)
Psychogenic Urinary Incontinence Inability to retain urine with no organic cause or reason.  Symptoms include unawareness that urination is taking place.  Urination can spontaneously occur while the animal is walking or sleeping.  (Overall) 

There is no behavioral assistance for this condition.
Psychyo-pharmacological
Adjunctive Therapy
Prescribed medications used either short- or long-tern to assist the animal and the owner in their behavioral modification goals.  Most therapy is short-term but this decision is case-driven. 
Rage Rare condition of extreme aggression affecting primarily Springer and Cocker Spaniels, Bull Terriers or Retrievers.  Some dominance may accompany.  (Dodman)  See also Idiopathic Aggression . 
Recreational Barking Barking vocalization that is beyond “normal” attention seeking and has progressed to self-rewarding or amusement as an activity.  Barks are definitive by sound distinction.  They are playful but will run a predictable, species-specific range within attached volleys. 
Redirected Aggression One of the thirteen classifications of aggression.  Sentinel symptoms include: aggression that is consistently directed toward a third party when the patient is thwarted or interrupted from exhibiting aggressive behaviors to its primary target; the aggression is not accidental, and the patient actively pursues the third party, particularly if associated directly with the interruption of the patient’s previous behaviors. 

Can be exhibited as a response to a correction, a thwarted desire or lack of expected outcome; correction could be physical or verbal; may be a growl or involve active inhibition of the person or animal doing the correction or thwarting (biting of hand or wrist); biting of a third dog that intervenes in a fight; may be more common with social maturity (18 to 24/36 months of age); individual victimized (human or animal) was not part of the original social interaction; part of the control complex that includes dominance aggression .  (Overall)
Ritualized Behavior A patterned response followed dogmatically despite attempts from owners or others to change the pattern.  Usually resistant to casual treatment due to the structure of first-order-learning and environmental cues (correct or incorrect).
Roaming Locomotor activity involving extended absences and variable distance that is in excess of that needed for the animal to relieve itself; trajectory of movement may be determined by the presence of other animals, the estrous cycles of other animals, or behaviors related to patrolling.  (Overall)
Rough surface licking Can be a symptom of CCD; can be a symptom of inhaled allergies accompanied by gulp-like swallowing and may include panic behaviors
Satyrasis Excessive solicitation, mounting, and sexual thrusting (with or without intromission and ejaculation) by a male animal regardless of degree of provocation, may be directed interspecifically or intraspecifically, to animals or inanimate objects.  (Overall).
Self Mutilation Barbering or removal of coat or abrasion, petechiation, or ulceration of any body part by use of teeth, claws or an external substrate (e.g. rubbing against a wall) in excess of that necessary for normal grooming and maintenance behaviors and in the absence of any dematological or physiological condition.  (Overall)
Separation Anxiety Physical or behavioral signs of distress exhibited by the animal only in the absence or lack of access to a specific person or set of persons.

Consistent, intensive destruction, elimination, vocalization, or salivation exhibited only in the virtual or actual absence of a persons or set of persons (e.g. when denied access through a door or when left alone); behaviors are most severe within the first 15 to 20 minutes of separation, and many anxiety behaviors (autonomic hyperactivity, increased motor activity, and increased vigilance and scanning) may become apparent as the person or set of persons displays behaviors associated with the intention to leave.  (Overall modified)

Typical pattern of vocalization starts high and may or may not reduce.
Sound Phobia See Noise Phobia.
Status Related Anxiety See Leadership Anxiety
Status-Related Aggression Relates to the need to confer priority of access to resources.  (Overall)
Submissive Urination Urination that occurs in an otherwise housebroken animal only when an animal is exhibiting species-specific postures associated with defferential behavior and that is worsened by approaches that solicit such deferential behaviors (e.g. reaching over, rolling over) in an animal that shows no signs of fear or aggression.  (Overall)
Substrate Preference Consistent elimination in an area or areas that are linked by some common sensory aspect.  (Overall)

Can be area-specific.
Tail Chasing Repetitive locomotor activity directed toward following the trajectory established by the animal’s tail that is in excess of activity required fro grooming and that cannot be externally or volitionally stopped.  Likely to be associated with OCD.  (Overall)
Territorial Aggression One of the thirteen classifications of aggression.  Sentinel symptoms include aggression that in consistently demonstrated in the vicinity of a mobile or stationary circumscribed area when that area is approached by another individual in the absence of an actual, contextual threat from that individual.  As aggression intensifies with decreasing distance, despite attempts at intervention, correction or the desire to interact on the part of the approaching individual. 

[Territorial aggression is] protection of property by barking, growling, snarling and biting; property can be stationary (house) or mobile (car); protects regardless of who is present; symptoms worsen with fence or any type of confinement; clear definition of boundaries; aggression intensifies as approach distance decreases; unaggressive in the absence of territory, but may quickly redefine territory; may be a part of the control complex that includes dominance aggression .  While all aggression treatments can benefit from neutering, specifically territorial aggression may diminish markedly from neutering alone.  (Overall)

“Terra” meaning ground or area.
Territorial Behavior  
Thunderstorm Phobia Sudden and profound, non-graded, extreme response to any aspect of thunderstorms (noise, dark, changes in barometric pressure, changes in ozone levels) manifest as intense, active avoidance, escape or anxiety behaviors associated with the activities of the sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system; behaviors can include catatonia or mania concomitant with decreased sensitivity to pain or social stimuli, repeated exposure results in an invariant pattern of response.  (Overall)
Trauma-Based Anxiety (see Fear Aggression and P.T.S.D .)  Fear of pain, or anticipated pain or discomfort, based on experience.   
Trichotillomania Consistent repetitive stereotypic removal of hair from follicles in the absence of conditions concomitant with self-mutilation; in this condition there is no injury to the skin.  (Overall)

A form of self-mutilation where the animal systematically removes it’s own hair by pulling, chewing or scratching.  May be a form of displacement behavior or obsessive compulsive in nature.  Probability of mixed signals is high.  Depending upon severity, may require psycho-pharmacological adjunctive therapy during behavioral modification.
Undersocialized  
Urinary Incontinence Non-volitional lack of control of urination that is not associated with an underlying physical or physiological condition.  (Overall)  

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